Pennsylvania: How Towns Are Defined in “The Keystone State”

Pennsylvania consist of four different types of municipalities: townships, counties, cities, and boroughs. Townships have varying sizes ranging from as little as six to as much as four square miles based upon geographical geographical boundaries. The state currently has nine-hundred fifty-eight boroughs and over fifteen-hundred townships. Some towns in the state are also classified as…

Pennsylvania consist of four different types of municipalities: townships, counties, cities, and boroughs. Townships have varying sizes ranging from as little as six to as much as four square miles based upon geographical geographical boundaries. The state currently has nine-hundred fifty-eight boroughs and over fifteen-hundred townships. Some towns in the state are also classified as home governed, meaning they have their own charter with set state government limitations. Every type of municipality is divided into a class of first, second, or third. Townships can not reach first class status unless the population surpasses three hundred people per square mile and an existing second class status is present. Cranberry Woods, for example, exists as part of the Cranberry Township located in the Butler County region. Visitors can choose from fifty-six cities with Philadelphia being not only the largest but also the only one containing a first class status. Various other cities are classified under a second or third class status. Boroughs have a smaller geographical area than cities while townships spread over even less of an area and have the smallest population counts of all the state municipalities.

Cranberry Township Serves as a Shining Example of a Developed Municipality

Cranberry Township is ranked as second class with a population of approximately twenty-eight thousand. Located in the western portion of Pennsylvania, it is considered to be a suburb of Pittsburgh. The United States Census Bureau reported the municipality as covering 22.8 square miles of mostly land. This town originated in 1804 with the most populated portion commonly referred to as “Criders Corners” after the junction of two roads: Old Perry Highway and Old Mars-Criders Road. It was actually named after Jacob Crider, a Dutilh Methodist Church trustee, who purchased land in 1871. The township contains additional well-known little towns such as Ogle and Fernway. Its location has been a large contributor for overall growth due to Cranberry being an intersection of Interstate 76, Route 19, and Route 228. Locals use the surrounding highways to cut down travel time in Pittsburgh since the community is in a position for easy interstate access . Bus services are another mode of transportation providing access throughout the area.

The town is a fast growing location not only in population, but also in regards to incoming business. Several known businesses stay in Thorn Hill Industrial Park and various large name retailers are located in the Cranberry Mall region. Westinghouse Electric Company has made the Cranberry Woods area its national headquarters with the move completed in 2010. The company, specializing in nuclear technology, supplies fuel, services, equipment, and design assistance to the electrical power industry. Their goal is to create cleaner electricity to all future generations through the globe. While a little confusing, the many Pennsylvania municipalities offer a wide array of activities to locals or those visiting the area. Individuals can enjoy culture, entertainment, dining, fine arts, and are surrounding by several leading national companies. Businesses choose this area for multiple reasons and many individuals have made Cranberry Township their home.